Huffy Rock-It Kids' BMX Bike - Blue and Red

huffy rock-it kids bmx bike - blue and red - side view
Nice handlebar angle

Huffy bikes have been everywhere, forever. At least that's how it seemed as a kid growing up in the American suburbs. Everyone had a Huffy bike, or knew someone else who had a Huffy, or made fun of the kid down the street who owned a Huffy. Despite the company's years as a legendary made-in-U.S.A. bicycle manufacturer, "Huffy" basically meant "piece of junk". It was an odd form of brand recognition, certainly.

I wonder if Huffy bicycles still carry that stigma today? With plenty of other notoriously bad brands and ugly made-in-China bicycle-esque contraptions like Next, Kent and Rhino gracing department-store bike display racks, maybe Huffy bikes command a new respect. I doubt it.

huffy rock-it kids bmx bike - blue and red - front angle view
Red forks are not cool

But since most parents don't want to spend too much on Junior's first bike, they don't really care. Huffy bikes are cheap. Sure, they're not made particularly well, but if you keep all of the nuts and bolts tight, and make sure the tires are inflated, and don't leave it out in the rain, a Huffy bike will last at least until your kid outgrows it.

And the kid will never know the difference. Little kids like new, shiny, good looking things. And when it was new and shiny, this Huffy Rock-It kids' BMX bike was pretty good looking, at least to the eight-year-old kid who got it for Christmas.

huffy rock-it kids bmx bike - blue and red - front end
At least you won't get "flange blisters"

Like most Huffy bikes, the Rock-It's mantra could be "steel is real". It has a mild steel frame, fork, handlebars, cranks, sprocket, stem, and so on. None of that is unusual or impressive; it is what it is. Toss in a pair of 20-inch wheels with a coaster brake and knobby tires, and a padded vinyl seat with a Huffy logo, and you have a decent little BMX bike.

huffy rock-it kids bmx bike - blue and red - handlebars
Loud safety pads

But if you're working in the Huffy bicycles design studio with the goal of convincing Suburban Mom to put the Rock-It under the Christmas tree, you can't stop at "decent little BMX bike". So you add a bright red vinyl padset with loud blue and yellow "Rock-It" graphics to get Junior's attention. Mom doesn't want to spend her life trying to get grease stains out of the leg of Junior's Toughskins, so you put on a big plastic chainguard. Which gives you more real estate for more graphics, and makes this little Huffy bike look almost like some sort of futuristic motorcycle. And since Junior might be a little wobbly, you recess the back of the chainguard to allow for training wheels.

huffy rock-it kids bmx bike - blue and red - head tube
Hecho en Mexico

The Huffy Rock-It has a dark blue frame and red fork for even more visual appeal. I think it's kind of ugly, but I'm not a wide-eyed child shopping with my mom at Walmart, and that's the key demographic for a Huffy kids' BMX bike.

This particular Rock-It shows the signs of cheap construction, specifically the heavily pitted, flaking and peeling chrome plating on the handlebars and rims. Steel wool can't help that. One of the crappy plastic imitation Mushroom grips has a broken flange. And the entire bike is dirty. But other than the sad fate of the low-quality chrome, this little Huffy bike is in good condition.

So that's the Huffy Rock-It kid's BMX bike. Scroll down for more photos.

huffy rock-it kids bmx bike - blue and red - frame decals
Rock-It and Huffy decals
huffy rock-it kids bmx bike - blue and red - seat
Oddly out-of-place Huffy logo
huffy rock-it kids bmx bike - blue and red - fork decals
That rim is rusty
huffy rock-it kids bmx bike - blue and red - seat tube decal
This sticker makes no sense at all
huffy rock-it kids bmx bike - blue and red - chainguard
Keepin' your jeans clean
huffy rock-it kids bmx bike - blue and red - sprocket and chainguard
Turbine
huffy rock-it kids bmx bike - blue and red - back of chainguard
Chainguard, recessed for training wheels